Normal Amsler Grid appearance.
Normal Amsler Grid appearance.

Normal Amsler Grid appearance.

Appearance of Amsler grid with macular disease. Note distorted image.

Appearance of Amsler grid with macular disease.
Note distorted image.

Normal Amsler Grid appearance.

Appearance of Amsler grid with wet AMD.
Note distortion and darkened spot.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of vision loss in persons over 50 years of age world-wide. Millions are affected, and because it is an aging change, AMD is becoming increasingly common as the world population ages.

“Dry” AMD is the earliest stage, and affects everyone with AMD. Most people with dry AMD have good vision on the eye chart, but have increasing difficulty at night and indoors, needing more light and higher contrast (black and white rather than shades of grey) to see well. Severe visual loss with dry AMD is uncommon, and usually occurs when a condition called “geographic atrophy” develops.

“The other day I realized that I was reading the scores at the bottom of the TV screen again. I couldn’t do that before the laser treatment. And the distortion and waviness was gone.” 76 year old woman with dry AMD.

“Wet” AMD is the most common reason people with dry AMD lose vision. This happens when an eye with dry AMD develops scar tissue growth under the center of the retina (called the macula), causing damage that destroys the macula and central, sharp vision. Without macular vision, your ability to read, recognize faces, and drive may be lost.

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If you have “dry” AMD, Retinal Protective Therapy TM (RPT) can reduce the risk of vision loss in dry AMD.  The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) showed that vitamins can reduce the risk of visual loss in dry AMD by about 4% per year. Recent studies suggest that RPT can reduce your risk of visual loss by more than 90%, or more, per year. At the same time, RPT improves indoor vision, making it easier to read and watch TV.  

If you have “wet” AMD, RPT can help in several important ways. As you know, drugs injected into the eye are the primary treatment for wet AMD. RPT helps these drugs work better. What does this mean? Real-world data indicates that RPT can decrease the number of injections needed by 40% or more.  By decreasing the number of injections, RPT can reduce the risks of vision-threatening complications of injections, such as macular atrophy, infection and glaucoma. 

Studies have shown that the effects of RPT in AMD tend to wear off and return to pre-treatment levels in about 6-9 months. Therefore, to maintain maximum treatment benefits to minimize your risks of vision loss from AMD, patients with AMD should consider RPT every 3-4 months. 

Normal retinal appearance

Mesopic (real life) visual fields of eye with dry AMD (AREDS cat 3): left side, before; right side, after, Retinal Protective Therapy.
Note poor visual function before treatment, and marked improvement after RPT.

Mesopic (real life) visual fields of patient with dry AMD (AREDS cat 3): left side, before; right side, after Retinal Protective Therapy. Note improvement in visual function after RPT

Mesopic (real life) visual fields of patient with dry AMD (AREDS cat 3): left side, before; right side, after Retinal Protective Therapy.
Note improvement in visual function after RPT

Multifocal electroretinogram of patient with dry AMD, AREDS Category 3. Top = before RPT. Bottom = after RPT. Note marked improvement in retinal function (health) after RPT.

Multifocal electroretinogram of patient with dry AMD, AREDS Category 3. Top = before RPT. Bottom = after RPT.
Note marked improvement in retinal function (health) after RPT.

Normal retinal appearance

Normal retinal appearance

Dry age-related macular degeneration. High-risk for vision loss.

Dry age-related macular degeneration.
Note yellow area of “worn out”
retina in the macula (geographic atrophy).

Dry age-related macular degeneration. Note yellow area of “worn out” retina in the macula (geographic atrophy).

Dry age-related macular degeneration.
High-risk for vision loss.

Wet age-related macular degeneration. Note bleeding in the macula.

Wet age-related macular degeneration.
Note bleeding in the macula.